Frequently Asked Questions


Scrambled Data

What does "scrambled" data mean?

A data point that is scrambled is randomly adjusted up or down between 5% and 20% from the actual value. Certain data points like scores and game stats are scrambled, while all other data points, like schedules, teams and players are not scrambled.

This allows customers to start their integration before having to upgrade to one of our premium API subscriptions.

You can check if a data point is scrambled or not in the 5th column of our Data Dictionary.

Data Collection and Validation

How do you collect your data?

We collect data using a variety of methods. The high level workflow below summarizes our process.

  • For real time coverage, we have a team of statisticians watching games and entering data into our system.
  • We employ a separate quality control team to monitor the data, looking for any discrepancies.
  • Finally, in case our QC team misses anything, we use web crawlers to cross-check our data against the official stats published on public facing websites.

How accurate is your data?

Becuase our stats are used to power fantasy contests for cash, they need to be 100% accurate, and in line with the league's official stats. While we can't guarantee perfect stats while an event is in progress, we guarantee accuracy after the event has been over for a period of 12-24 hours.

For NFL, do you handle mid-week corrections?

Yes. These can be published as late as Thursday, so in some cases, our database won't reflect midweek corrections until Fridays. Although, we have most of them made by Wednesday/Thursday.

For MLB, how do you handle postponed & suspended games?

Postponed Games
If an MLB game is postponed due to weather (or any other reason), we set Game.Status = "Postponed" for the game in question. Postponed games are essentially canceled, as they have no chance to be played to completion (unlike Suspended games, see below). When the MLB announces the date/time of the make-up game, we create a new Game record for the make-up game. In order to tie the postponed & make-up games together, we set the following fields on the both Game records: RescheduledGameID and RescheduledFromGameID

Suspended Games
If an MLB game is suspended due to weather (or any other reason), we set Game.Status = "Suspended" for the game in question. Suspended games are halted, but still have a chance to be played to completion. If a Suspended game resumes, we set Game.Status = "InProgress" and continue to cover the game. If a Suspended game is called off, then one of the two scenarios will follow. (read more about MLB game suspensions here)

  • Suspended Game is Postponed Before Becoming a Regulation Game
    Based on the MLB Rulebook, if the game does NOT meet certain criteria (see below), then it is declared "No Game" and it is postponed, as if it has never played. We'll set Game.Status = "Postponed" and then proceed with the rules for postponed games.

    If a game is called, it is a regulation game: (1) If five innings have been completed; (2) If the home team has scored more runs in four or four and a fraction half-innings than the visiting team has scored in five completed half-innings; (3) If the home team scores one or more runs in its half of the fifth inning to tie the score.

  • Suspended Game Becomes a Regulation Game
    Based on the MLB Rulebook, if the game meets certain criteria (see below), then it is declared an official game, and it is to be resumed at a later date where the game left off. Therefore, the Game record remains in our database with Game.Status = "Suspended" until play is resumed at a later date (sometimes as late as several weeks later). When the game resumes play, the Game record gets set with Game.Status = "InProgress" and everything continues as a game normally would. In this scenario, the Game.GameID, Game.Day, and Game.DateTime never change.

    If a game is called, it is a regulation game: (1) If five innings have been completed; (2) If the home team has scored more runs in four or four and a fraction half-innings than the visiting team has scored in five completed half-innings; (3) If the home team scores one or more runs in its half of the fifth inning to tie the score.

Where do you get your odds information?

Our odds data is based on a formula calculating a weighted average from a few of the largest online casinos. It's similar to Covers.com and VegasInsider.com.